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Seton Hill Athletic Teams Achieve Highest Overall GPA in PSAC
Thursday, July 17, 2014

Seven SHU teams land Top Team GPA Award in Conference for 2013-14

 

Seton Hill University’s athletic teams attained the highest grade point average among all schools in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference during the 2013-14 academic year, PSAC Commissioner Steve Murray has announced.

 

“The work ethic of our student athletes is outstanding. The way they perform in the classroom correlates with their efforts on the playing field. The Seton Hill community is very proud of them,” said Mary C. Finger, Ed.D., Seton Hill president.

 

The Seton Hill athletic teams competing in the PSAC averaged a 3.327 GPA during the University’s first year in the conference. The PSAC issues academic awards across 21 conference-sponsored sports, and Seton Hill competes in 17 of those. While the PSAC hosts a total of 23 sports championships and Seton Hill competes in 19 of those sports, indoor and outdoor track & field are combined for the academic awards.

 

In addition to the overall achievement, seven Seton Hill athletic teams received the Top Team GPA Award from the PSAC for reaching the highest GPA among their sports across the conference, which includes 18 public and private institutions in Pennsylvania.

 

The seven Seton Hill teams with the highest GPA among their peers include: Women’s tennis (3.722); women’s cross country (3.701); women’s golf (3.613); women’s track and field (3.520); women’s basketball (3.496); men’s soccer (3.430); and wrestling (3.297).

 

“Today we congratulate each of the team’s for their efforts, and we celebrate their hard work and achievement of academic excellence. This recognition is tremendous for Seton Hill and also acknowledges the wonderful support our students receive from coaches, faculty and staff,” said Chris Snyder, Seton Hill’s Executive Director for Athletic Programs.

 

 

Family, Seton Hill Community Put Mark on Final Beam of Health Science Center Named for Dr. JoAnne Boyle
Wednesday, July 09, 2014

They raised black markers and signed their names on the 33-foot-long white support beam as university officials held a “topping-off ceremony” for the JoAnne Woodyard Boyle Health Sciences Center, under construction. The support will be the last put in place as part of the beam construction, officials said.

Boyle died in November after serving 25 years as university president.

“It's a deep honor for all of us,” son John Boyle said. “We're very touched. The Seton Hill community will always have a special place for our family.”

A heavy rain forced participants inside the nearby Reeves Theatre building for the beginning of the ceremony.

But the sun emerged in time for Boyle family members and about 150 university officials, students and others to etch their names on the beam on display in front of the center.

Art Boyle, the late president's husband, was the first to sign.

The center will serve more than 500 students enrolled in the university's Division of Natural and Health Sciences.

It will open in 2015 and contain examination rooms, classrooms, laboratories and office space for the university's physician assistant program and new technology laboratories for undergraduate research and classes.

Costs are projected at $21.5 million for the center and accompanying renovations to Lynch Hall.

Boyle helped inspire the establishment of the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine on the campus, the physician assistant program and the Center for Orthodontics.

“Today we celebrate a historic occasion in the life of Seton Hill as we come together for this beam signing — the topping-off ceremony,” said Mary Finger, who became the university's 10th president in June.

“The critical need for well-educated health care professionals has been at the forefront of thought for more than a decade, as Seton Hill built strong partnerships and enhanced its curriculum to meet the needs of the region,” she said.

The center shows the university's commitment to providing “our students with premier resources and is a testament to the university's tremendous growth,” Finger said.

The project was kick-started by a $7 million grant from the Richard King Mellon Foundation, the largest gift in the school's history. The Katherine Mabis McKenna Foundation pledged another $1.5 million.

“I salute JoAnne Boyle and the vision she had for our special university,” Finger said.

Bob Stiles is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-836-6622 or bstiles@tribweb.com.

Chinese Female Business Owners Not So Different, Seton Hill Group Finds
Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Colorful desserts impressed a number of Chinese female business owners when Valley Dairy President Melissa Blystone featured them in a presentation about the company.

“They're not a big dessert country, so they were really fascinated by how pretty we make our desserts and the extent we go (to make) them,” said Blystone, president of the Latrobe-based company that owns 11 restaurant locations, including one in the city where the banana split was invented in 1904.

Blystone was a part of a group that traveled to the University of Nanjing last month with the Greensburg chapter of the Women Presidents' Organization based at Seton Hill University.

“I just thought that was a huge honor to go do that,” she said.

Seven people traveled on a 14-hour flight from Pittsburgh to Shanghai, then took a four-hour bus trip to Nanjing.

Each of the members of the Greensburg group, including Blystone, made a presentation in a special session of the Eighth International Symposium on Multinational Business Management, co-sponsored by a number of universities, including Seton Hill.

Jayne Huston, director of the Greensburg university's e-Magnify women business center, said Seton Hill first established a relationship with the Chinese business program through JoAnne Boyle, Seton Hill's past president.

About 150 to 200 people, including international participants, took part in the conference.

Four Chinese female business owners also took part with the local presenters, with each giving an overview of their company.

Lee Ann Munger, director of e-Magnify's PowerLink program, said women from both countries struggle with the balance between work and family life as they advance in every field.

With flexibility, determination and passion, some are inspired to start their own businesses so they can raise a family and advance in their industry, Munger said.

“Those motivations seem to be similar between the United States and Chinese business owners,” she said.

Barbara VanKirk, president of IQ Inc., a software development consulting company based in Murrysville, said that's why she started her business 20 years ago.

The Chinese women were very welcoming, she said, and both groups worked through a language barrier, which was eased by an interpreter.

“It really makes you stop and think about your presentation,” she said, adding it was gratifying to see “those light-bulb moments” when ideas would translate well.

VanKirk brought ornaments depicting Pittsburgh's inclines from August Wendell Forge to share as tokens from Pittsburgh, and Blystone shared banana split pins from Valley Dairy.

Jan Lehigh, president of Alpine Packaging in North Versailles, passed out scratch-and-sniff labels and enjoyed watching the enthusiasm with which her audience scratched other items made by the company, like polyethylene bags, without a scent.

The group from the Women Presidents' Organization also went sightseeing in Beijing and Shanghai, including a trip to the Great Wall of China.

The “once-in-a-lifetime” trip was highlighted by the warm atmosphere fostered at the conference, she said.

“They were so friendly, so accommodating,” Lehigh said, adding that university students would even offer to carry heavy bags as the visitors crossed campus.

All of the local women reflected on how it seemed that for the Chinese business owners, their husbands still “held the purse strings,” as VanKirk said.

Overall, however, Munger said that despite the thousands of miles between Chinese and local female business owners, the group learned that they were not so different.

“When you bring it down to a personal level, we have more in common — by far — than the differences that separate us,” she said.

Stacey Federoff is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-836-6660 or sfederoff@tribweb.com.

 

Mary Finger Named Tenth President of Seton Hill University
Friday, May 02, 2014

Following an extensive national search, Seton Hill University’s Board of Trustees overwhelmingly elected Mary C. Finger Ed.D. as Seton Hill’s tenth president. Finger will assume the role by July 1. The announcement was made by Michele Ridge, Chair of the University’s Board of Trustees and Chair of the Presidential Search Committee.

Finger succeeds JoAnne Boyle who retired from Seton Hill in June 2013.

The Seton Hill University Board of Trustees’ decision completes a year-long process that involved participation from the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, Trustees, President’s Council, students, faculty and staff, alumni, friends, and community leaders. 

“After reviewing more than 70 nominations submitted to our search firm, R.H. Perry & Associates, for the Seton Hill presidency, Dr. Finger emerged as the top candidate,” Ridge said. She continued, “Dr. Finger is well suited to lead Seton Hill through the next important stage in the University’s history. Throughout her career, she has proved herself a strategic thinker with a demonstrated commitment to Catholic education, philanthropy and civic engagement. We are confident she will fulfill and articulate the mission and vision of the University in a compelling way to all Seton Hill constituencies.”

Sr. Catherine Meinert, Provincial Superior and President of the U.S. Province of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill and Vice Chair of the Seton Hill University Board of Trustees said, “The Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, who founded the college and are still actively engaged in the life of the university, are pleased that Mary Finger will serve as the tenth President of Seton Hill. We know she will continue to advance our identity, the legacy of our distinctive Setonian tradition, and in the words of Elizabeth Ann Seton, ‘help fit our students for the world in which they are destined to live.’”

James Breisinger, Trustee and Vice Chair of the Presidential Search Committee added, “Mary Finger is a thoughtful leader, whose creativity will inspire others to become involved in the life of this special university.” Breisinger added, “Dr. Finger brings a wealth of knowledge regarding the challenges facing the higher education industry, specifically Catholic universities, along with practical experience to Seton Hill. Her work in evaluating enrollment trends and academic programs, along with her deep understanding of business and marketing, will continue to move the University forward on many levels, but particularly as we work to help our students succeed in a contemporary world. Her expertise will be especially valuable as we develop priority campus expansion projects such as The JoAnne Woodyard Boyle Health Sciences Center on our hilltop campus and the Dance and Visual Arts Center in downtown Greensburg.”

“Seton Hill University has successfully met many challenges that the great majority of private colleges and universities in the United States are facing with creativity and a deep commitment to mission,” said Mary Finger. She continued, “I am honored to be given the opportunity to serve as President of Seton Hill. I look forward to working with Trustees, the President’s Council, faculty, students, staff, alumni, friends and community leaders to lead the University’s next stage as Seton Hill builds on its remarkable history and tremendous strengths. I will embrace as well the opportunity to immerse myself into the life of the Greensburg community and the southwestern Pennsylvania region.”

Mary Finger comes to Seton Hill following nine years of service as Senior Vice President for Advancement at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. She led and implemented the institution’s first comprehensive capital campaign, Many Dreams, One Mission. The campaign, scheduled to conclude in June 2014, achieved its original $250 million goal in 2012, and is on track to exceed the revised $300 million goal. During her tenure, Finger managed the integration ofDePaul's alumni relations, alumni communications and fund-raising operations into a robust advancement program. She revitalized DePaul's annual giving program and developed a foundation relations program that resulted in increased multi-million dollar national foundation support. 

In addition, she co-chaired the Task Force on Innovation that created processes for developing and evaluating new academic programs at DePaul and examined alternative instructional and delivery methods. 

As part of DePaul's strategic planning process, Finger served on the Financial Planning/Business Sustainability Task Forces responsible for providing long-term assessment and plans for institutional viability, enhancement of academic prominence, increased enrollment and retention, and successful fund-raising initiatives. She chaired DePaul's Affinity Task Force that developed new programs to deepen student engagement with the university as well.

Prior to her position at DePaul, Mary Finger served as Vice President for Planning and Institutional Advancement at Mount Mary University, formerly Mount Mary College, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; as Director of Development for the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois; as Acting Executive Director of the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee Foundation; and as Director of Annual Fund and Alumni Relations at Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee. In her varied professional roles Finger had responsibility for strategy development, enrollment marketing, major gift solicitation, and town/gown relationships. Simultaneously, Finger expanded interest and involvement in institutional programming while engaging alumni, parents and friends in the work of those institutions. 

Fluent in Spanish, Mary Finger also worked in the Bilingual Education Department, Milwaukee Public Schools, and served as a volunteer in Bogota, Colombia, South America. 

A native of Chicago, Finger has an adult daughter living and working in Spain with her husband and two children.

Finger served as a member of the Board of Trustees for St. Augustine College, Chicago, Illinois and also at Journey House, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Mary Finger’s honors and awards include the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Award for development and communication programming as well as two Telly Awards for those same efforts.

Finger received a doctoral degree (Ed.D.) in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Arts degree from Mount Mary College and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Marquette University.

 

 
 
JoAnne Woodyard Boyle Health Sciences Center/view the construction site
Thursday, April 10, 2014

Why A New Health Sciences Center?

Today, the health sciences continue to represent some of the university’s strongest academic programs. Seton Hill’s Physician Assistant Program boasts a 97% first- time graduate pass rate on the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE); this program has also been named one of the best graduate schools for health by U.S. News & World Report. As enrollments in the health sciences continue to increase, the university is dedicated to providing students with the facilities and resources to match the caliber of its programs. To read more. visit SHU Health Sciences.Seton Hill’s programs in the sciences have been a hallmark of the school since its inception. Patricia Gabow, M.D. (SHU 1965) a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Board of Trustees and the recently retired CEO and medical director for the Denver Health and Hospital Authority, refers to her Seton Hill biology professor, Sr. Florence Marie Scott, as “an outstanding role model.” Herself a graduate of Seton Hill, Sr. Florence Marie also served as a Trustee of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, where she spent 32 summers conducting research.  Read more...

To view the building progress, please visit CONSTRUCTION  (viewable with Safari or Firefox only)

View the Health Sciences Ground Breaking

Seton Hill U. Names New Director of the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education
Monday, March 31, 2014

Seton Hill University has named Tim Crain, Ph.D., as director of the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education.  His appointment is effective July 1. 

Crain, who has extensive experience in Holocaust education and outreach in Wisconsin, will also hold the rank of assistant professor and will teach in the University’s Genocide and Holocaust Studies Program.  His appointment occurs as Sister Gemma Del Duca, one of the two founding co-directors of the Center, becomes co-director emerita.  Sr. Gemma will continue to serve as a consultant for the Center’s program with the Yad Vashem International School for Holocaust Studies in Israel. Sister Gemma and Sister Mary Noel Kernan, also a co-director emerita, founded the Center in 1987 with the support and direction of the then newly appointed president, Dr. JoAnne Boyle, and in response to the urging of Pope John Paul II to recognize the significance of the Holocaust and to promote its study.

Crain currently serves at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he is adjunct assistant professor in the Center for Jewish Studies and teaches courses on the Holocaust, modern Jewish history, and comparative history of religions.

In addition to his work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he serves as an adjunct professor in the College of Professional Studies at Marquette University. Prior to his current position, Crain held positions at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He served as director of outreach and taught in the Center of Jewish Studies and was also a senior lecturer in the history department.

Crain has been recognized with Outstanding Teaching Awards from both Marquette University (1999) and the University of Wisconsin-Stout (1992). In 2010, Marquette University recognized him with an Outstanding Service Award for teaching and service excellence in the College of Professional Studies.

Known for his community involvement, Crain has had extensive experience in outreach, grant writing, programming, and bridge building with the Jewish community of Southeastern Wisconsin. He has served on the Holocaust Executive Board of Milwaukee since 2006. Since 2000, he has worked with Jewish Wisconsin Educational tours recruiting participants and leading tours for Jewish Community members to destinations of Jewish interest in Ireland, Britain, Spain, Central Europe and Israel. He has been a popular lecturer and guest speaker providing numerous presentations for organizations ranging from the Milwaukee Jewish Community Center to the Milwaukee Catholic Home.

Crain holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy, history and political science from Marquette University, a master’s degree in British and Modern European history from Marquette University, and a Ph.D. with specializations in Modern Jewish, Modern Europe and Modern Middle East history from Arizona State University.

 

 

 

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